StarryWisdomCult

tsparks:

tortle:

catbuttcat:

rhamphotheca:

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens. 
Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators. 
Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society: Sign the petition here.
(via: American Bird Conservancy)

It’s really close, please sign guys!

killing one species to ‘protect’ another is a horrible approach to anything. Have people not learned by now? And how many other animals would this inevitably poison? Ones that would also not only ingest the poison, but the poisoned bird carcasses.What is wrong with people.

Crows and Ravens hold a sacred position in the Mythos of North America, they should be honored and revered not murdered. 

tsparks:

tortle:

catbuttcat:

rhamphotheca:

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens.

Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators.

Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society:

Sign the petition here.

(via: American Bird Conservancy)

It’s really close, please sign guys!

killing one species to ‘protect’ another is a horrible approach to anything. Have people not learned by now? And how many other animals would this inevitably poison? Ones that would also not only ingest the poison, but the poisoned bird carcasses.

What is wrong with people.

Crows and Ravens hold a sacred position in the Mythos of North America, they should be honored and revered not murdered. 

(via morganathewitch)

probablyasocialecologist:

Quirky quark combination creates exotic new particle
News from the world’s biggest particle smasher is that they have found a new particle. Image: brookhavenlab, CC BY-NC-ND

Since the spectacular discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gigantic particle accelerator outside Geneva, have suffered a bit of a drought when it comes to finding new particles. In a welcome relief, the LHCb collaboration, who run one of four large experiments at the LHC, have announced one of the most genuinely exciting observations to come out of the 27km super-collider so far – an exotic particle that cannot be explained by current theories.
…
In 2008 the Belle Collaboration in Japan reported the observation of a new exotic particle – the unfortunately drably named Z(4430)– (where – for its negative charge). This has a mass that places it in a dense forest of charmonium states – particles that are made up of a charm quark and a charm antiquark. Crucially though, the Z is electrically charged whereas all charmonium states must be neutral, clearly marking it out as something unusual.
After a careful analysis of data from 25,000 decays of mesons resulting from more than 180 trillion collisions at the LHC in 2011 and 2012, the new announcement confirms the existence of Z(4430)– with extremely high confidence. The particle was observed with an overwhelming significance of 13.9 sigma, well above the usual 5 sigma threshold required to declare a discovery. LHCb also went further than Belle by measuring the spin and parity of Z(4430)–, two quantum-mechanical properties that give a firm handle on the internal makeup of the particle.
The observation by LHCb is important because few physicists will take a result seriously until it has been seen by two independent experiments. This is why hundreds of millions of Euros were spent building two large detectors at the LHC. The observation of the Higgs boson by two independent teams, ATLAS and CMS, was what really convinced the scientific community that the particle was real.
This result is the clearest evidence yet of the existence of a tetraquark – a four-quark state, with the LHCb analysis suggesting that Z(4430)– is most likely to be made of a charm, anti-charm, down and anti-up quark. Theorists are now able to add a whole new type of particle to the quark model and begin the hard work of trying to understand exactly how these four quarks are bound together.
Meanwhile, physicists working at the LHC experiments will continue to explore unmapped regions of the subatomic world, with the hope of turning up more members of this exotic new family. Now that we know that at least one is out there, it is very unlikely that Z(4430)– is alone.

Source

probablyasocialecologist:

Quirky quark combination creates exotic new particle

News from the world’s biggest particle smasher is that they have found a new particle. Image: brookhavenlabCC BY-NC-ND

Since the spectacular discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gigantic particle accelerator outside Geneva, have suffered a bit of a drought when it comes to finding new particles. In a welcome relief, the LHCb collaboration, who run one of four large experiments at the LHC, have announced one of the most genuinely exciting observations to come out of the 27km super-collider so far – an exotic particle that cannot be explained by current theories.

In 2008 the Belle Collaboration in Japan reported the observation of a new exotic particle – the unfortunately drably named Z(4430) (where  for its negative charge). This has a mass that places it in a dense forest of charmonium states – particles that are made up of a charm quark and a charm antiquark. Crucially though, the Z is electrically charged whereas all charmonium states must be neutral, clearly marking it out as something unusual.

After a careful analysis of data from 25,000 decays of mesons resulting from more than 180 trillion collisions at the LHC in 2011 and 2012, the new announcement confirms the existence of Z(4430) with extremely high confidence. The particle was observed with an overwhelming significance of 13.9 sigma, well above the usual 5 sigma threshold required to declare a discovery. LHCb also went further than Belle by measuring the spin and parity of Z(4430), two quantum-mechanical properties that give a firm handle on the internal makeup of the particle.

The observation by LHCb is important because few physicists will take a result seriously until it has been seen by two independent experiments. This is why hundreds of millions of Euros were spent building two large detectors at the LHC. The observation of the Higgs boson by two independent teams, ATLAS and CMS, was what really convinced the scientific community that the particle was real.

This result is the clearest evidence yet of the existence of a tetraquark – a four-quark state, with the LHCb analysis suggesting that Z(4430) is most likely to be made of a charm, anti-charm, down and anti-up quark. Theorists are now able to add a whole new type of particle to the quark model and begin the hard work of trying to understand exactly how these four quarks are bound together.

Meanwhile, physicists working at the LHC experiments will continue to explore unmapped regions of the subatomic world, with the hope of turning up more members of this exotic new family. Now that we know that at least one is out there, it is very unlikely that Z(4430) is alone.

Source

(via scinerds)

mucholderthen:

THE LATEST THING IN MULTIMEDIA SCIENCE EDUCATION FOR 1922

From general electric on Tumblr:

The composition of a water molecule explained
in “Beyond the Microscope,” a GE science film from 1922. 

Actually, with our love of GIFs we’ve come around full circle …

(Source: slobbering, via morganathewitch)

awkwardsituationist:

though sea urchins don’t have eyes, they are covered in photoreceptors which collectively act as a retina, effectively making their entire bodies one big compound eye. sea urchins, one of the few marine organisms to have their genome sequenced, have about 23,000 genes (like a human), several of which are associated with sight, including those that govern the development of animal eyes.

"comparing all the genes of the sea urchin, it’s actually quite similar to humans," said george weinstock, who led the sequencing project. they are one of the few invertebrates on the human branch of the evolutionary tree. yet interestingly, they seem to be the only example of a deuterostome to have the rhabdomeric light sensors associated with protostomes, suggesting that rhabdomeric light detectors have been the norm for eyes throughout much of the animal kingdom’s history.

"we think of animals that have a head with centralized nervous systems and all their sense organs on top as being the ones capable of sophisticated behavior, but we’re finding more and more some animals can do pretty complex behaviors using a completely different style," notes sönke johnsen, a marine biologist at duke university who conducted the study on sea urchin vision.

the way that urchins apparently carry out eyesight - with a diffuse nerve net, where no region looks like a central processing unit - reflects how scientists are now often designing robots. “they’re finding it might be a lot better with a distributed system with many little processors and simpler sensors and simple rules, which end up creating fairly complicated behaviors as emergent properties.” [see: starlings post]”

photos of sea urchin tests up close by paul richman. when alive, tube feet would be seen coming from the holes, which the sea urchin uses primarily for sight, with the smaller dents seen in the tests, also containing photoreceptors, used for shading and blocking light. text sources.

(via morganathewitch)

Why is it important to publish in a nonprofit journal?

climateadaptation:

Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is one of my favorite science journals. All articles are open-source - meaning they’re free - no registration or fees. They focus on environmental scientific research in an “era of accelerated human impact.” Humans have disturbed virtually every natural system on earth.

So, how do we share knowledge about scientific research? Currently, there’s a maturing debate about whether scientific research should be free or paid. I’m quite interested in this debate. Especially since my tax dollars pay for much of this research, but I don’t have access to it. In fact, most science is publicly funded by taxpayer dollars typically through universities and direct government grants. The balance of journals get their funds from subscriptions, which average about $5,000 per year. Yes, you can subscribe to Scientific American for $25, yet the annual ‘script for the Journal of Coordination Chemistry is $11,000!

When a researcher publishes their findings, scientific journals charge the public very high fees for access, which prevents the majority of the world from learning more.

I think this is reasonably indefensible.

One article from the journal Nature typically costs $20 to $30. One of my articles published with International Journal of Climate Change costs $10 (I share it for free with those that ask).

The debate is so powerful that The Guardian newspaper created a special section called Open Source Scientific Publishing. It focuses on the changing landscape of scientific publishing, and the debates make for fun, if not serious, reading.

And there is a protest movement by senior scientists to boycott some of the bigger scientific journals in favor of open source, free access publications. The University of California has also joined the fight, protesting these high fees.

Some have argued that science journals are more interested in selling subscriptions, where they favor “superstar” researchers who can capture more fees over less flashy researchers. Competition among science journals is a surprisingly ugly business.

So, should science be free? I think so.

For my part, I favor peer-reviewed, open-source science publication generally, and the journal Elementa specifically. Elementa is a non-profit publisher of science with overlap in my field of climate change and climate adaptation. The partners are BioOne, Dartmouth, the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado Boulder, the University of Michigan, and the University of Washington.

Take a minute to read what the editors of Elementa have to say about why open source science matters and why it should be free to everyone.

(via scinerds)

patrickschierer:

Light Echoes from Supernova 1987A.

ILLUMINATED CODE FROM SPACE

Bioartis Haari Tesla (behance) - "Macrocosm and microcosm is an ancient Greek Neo-Platonic schema of seeing the same patterns reproduced in all levels of the cosmos, from the largest scale (macrocosm or universe-level) all the way down to the smallest scale (microcosm or sub-sub-atomic or even metaphysical-level). In the system the midpoint is Man, who summarizes thecosmos." - I was doing some researches  and I found experiment with miniatures of space so I decided to try my own. The result has been nebulae, galaxies and supernovae  transformed into microorganism.

(Source: devidsketchbook.com, via morganathewitch)

teatray-inthesky:

comicsncoolshit:

a bubble freezing at -10º F degrees

THIS IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING I HAVE EVER VIRTUALLY WITNESSED

teatray-inthesky:

comicsncoolshit:

a bubble freezing at -10º F degrees

THIS IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING I HAVE EVER VIRTUALLY WITNESSED

(via morganathewitch)

chirotus:

constant-instigator:

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

Oh wow! I’ve been wanting this for ages!

This needs to be in every history book along with a map showing where those nations have been pushed to now.

chirotus:

constant-instigator:

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

Oh wow! I’ve been wanting this for ages!

This needs to be in every history book along with a map showing where those nations have been pushed to now.

(via morganathewitch)